Craig Murray: Ways Forward To Independence

On 3 July, Glasgow P4Indy group hosted a digital meeting to hear Craig Murray speak about Ways Forward to Independence especially those avenues available to us internationally. After his talk Craig took questions from the meeting. Sixty people joined us for the event from all over Scotland.

You can listen to the talk and the Q&A here:

STOP PRESS: We have moved to a new mailing setup and there have been a few glitches. If you emailed us to send you the link to Craig Murray’s meeting but then you didn’t receive a reply from us, can you email us now to info@pensionersforindependence.scot. It will help us sort out the glitch and make sure we have you on our maillist. Thank you!

7 thoughts on “Craig Murray: Ways Forward To Independence

  1. Ian

    Gave up listening after 8 minutes. Serious need of conciseness required. If a transcript becomes available then I’ll read that.

    1. MmH Post author

      Hi Ian, I sympathise with your comment. And you have the version after I’d edited it! Maybe Craig is a better writer than he is a speaker. But also I think Zoom sometimes feels like a strange mixture between a chat with friends round the table and a formal speaking event. I think he does make some good points though. He certainly got me thinking about some thing’s I’d taken for granted which is always a good thing.

    2. Bill Laing

      I don’t agree.

      I thought it well worth listening to every word as Craig has a wealth of backround information but for those with a short attention span, here is my summary designed to fit in a tweet.

      London will NEVER agree to #Indyref2
      HR election to prove support for independence
      Declare independence
      Get international recognition with EU support
      Be prepared to defend your country

  2. John Fullerton

    Excellent. I’m grateful for this because Craig Murray’s argument has helped me clarify and strengthen my own thoughts on the way forward.

  3. Bruce MacDougall

    I am of the view that both Scotland and England are independent nations bound together only by a treaty signed between two governments in 1707. As such shouldn’t the process be as simple as a divorce where only one party wants it. Surely the first step should be to rescind the Treaty of Union.

  4. Bill Johnston

    I hold a similar view to Bruce on the two Nations bound by treaty issue. Be good to get this issue spelled out – how would we rescind the 1707 Treaty? Are there implications for the current Scotland Acts? Can SIP take a lead on getting an informed debate?

    In 2014 we were asked if Scotland should be an independent nation, implying that we are not a nation perhaps, but not if we wanted to rescind the 1707 Treaty. So that question is wide open and not compromised by the 2014 result. Equally the polls are showing a steady increase in support for Scottish independence.

    I reckon Scotland and England would be better apart, particularly since Brexit, which struck me as a powerful demand for English independence not only from the EU but the UK given the very English character of the debate. Several polls during the long period after 2016 showed that majorities of English voter would have traded Scotland and Norther Ireland to get ‘their’ Brexit.

    I reckon Johnson and Rees Mogg are probably out of step with much English opinion on the future of the UK just now, particularly Tory Party membership opinion. If asked it would be entirely possible that English voters would go for an Independent England rather than maintaining the UK. The Tories should be discussing this and not simply ignoring both Scottish and English opinion on the matter. Equally labour in England should look at the matter from that perspective and move away from their dogmatic adherence to the Union and opposition to Scottish Independence. Be interesting to know what the ‘Red Wall’ voters who dumped Labour for the Tories think about the future of the Union.

    No reason why we can’t get along as sovereign neighbours and economic fiends. There would be economic and defence issues, for example, to be untangled but that should not be an unsurmountable barrier.

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